bite (bit, bitten)

bite (bit, bitten)
عَضَّ \ bite (bit, bitten): to cut with the teeth: We bite our food. She bit into the apple, be likely to do this to people Does this dog bite?. snap: to bite (or try to bite): The dog snapped (at) my leg.

Arabic-English glossary. 2015.

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  • bite — [bīt] vt. bit [bit] bitten [bit′ n] or biting [ME biten < OE bītan < IE base * bheid , to split, crack > BEETLE1, BITTER, L findere, to split (see FISSION)] …   English World dictionary

  • bite — bite1 [ baıt ] (past tense bit [ bıt ] ; past participle bit|ten [ bıtn ] ) verb ** 1. ) intransitive or transitive to use your teeth to cut or break something, usually in order to eat it: I wish you wouldn t bite your nails. bite into: Tom had… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • bite — [[t]ba͟ɪt[/t]] ♦ bites, biting, bit, bitten 1) VERB If you bite something, you use your teeth to cut into it, for example in order to eat it or break it. If an animal or person bites you, they use their teeth to hurt or injure you. [V n] Both… …   English dictionary

  • bite — bitable, biteable, adj. /buyt/, v., bit, bitten or bit, biting, n. v.t. 1. to cut, wound, or tear with the teeth: She bit the apple greedily. The lion bit his trainer. 2. to grip or hold with the teeth: Stop biting your lip! …   Universalium

  • bite — I UK [baɪt] / US verb Word forms bite : present tense I/you/we/they bite he/she/it bites present participle biting past tense bit UK [bɪt] / US past participle bitten UK [ˈbɪt(ə)n] / US ** 1) [intransitive/transitive] to use your teeth to cut or… …   English dictionary

  • bite — [c]/baɪt / (say buyt) verb (bit, bitten or, Archaic, bit, biting) –verb (t) 1. to cut into or wound, with the teeth: the dog bit me. 2. to grip with the teeth. 3. to sting, as an insect. 4. to cau …  

  • bit — There are three distinct nouns bit in English, but the two most ancient ones are probably both related ultimately to the verb bite. Bit as in ‘drill bit’ [OE] originally meant simply ‘bite’ or ‘biting’. The Old English word, bite, came from… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • bit — There are three distinct nouns bit in English, but the two most ancient ones are probably both related ultimately to the verb bite. Bit as in ‘drill bit’ [OE] originally meant simply ‘bite’ or ‘biting’. The Old English word, bite, came from… …   Word origins

  • bite — I. verb (bit; bitten; also bit; biting) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English bītan; akin to Old High German bīzan to bite, Latin findere to split Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. to seize especially with teeth or jaws so as… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Bitten — Bite Bite (b[imac]t), v. t. [imp. {Bit} (b[i^]t); p. p. {Bitten} (b[i^]t t n), {Bit}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Biting}.] [OE. biten, AS. b[=i]tan; akin to D. bijten, OS. b[=i]tan, OHG. b[=i]zan, G. beissen, Goth. beitan, Icel. b[=i]ta, Sw. bita, Dan.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bite — bite, gnaw, champ, gnash are comparable when they mean to attack with or as if with the teeth. Bite fundamentally implies a getting of the teeth, especially the front teeth, into something so as to grip, pierce, or tear off {bite an apple deeply} …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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